Letter advocating preservation of the Paolo Soleri Amphitheater

Posted in architecture, cities, design, Theater Bowl with tags on July 3, 2010 by architectcs

Chairman Joe Garcia
All Indian Pueblo Council

June 21, 2010

Dear Chairman Garcia,

Following the lead of the alumni of the Santa Fe Indian School, I write you to advocate the preservation of the Paolo Soleri Amphitheater.  I have been told you are a wise, compassionate and experienced leader and hope you will hear my few words in favor of the Paolo Soleri.

Lloyd Kiva New chose architect Soleri to design the amphitheater before Soleri attained the international stature he holds in our time.  It is prophetic that the amphitheater’s patron had the vision to recognize Soleri’s genius long before others saw it.  Lloyd Kiva New lived his life as an unparalleled champion of Indian arts and culture and as a cultural bridge-builder in our fragmented world..  Stewart Udall credited him as one who inspired the National Museum of the American Indian.  Soleri, at 90, is recognized as a grandfather of sustainable architecture concepts.  His idea of compact cities, integrating living and work, “Arcology”, harks back to traditional Southwest Pueblos.  Students worldwide study his work.

The SFIS campus is home to an international architectural gem.  It’s flowing, organic form is not so different from the work of Indian sculptors I see in galleries and at Indian Market in Santa Fe.  It’s steep, wrap-around seating and small stage fuse a special intimacy between performer and audience.  These qualities endear the Paolo Soleri Amphitheater to SFIS students for their ceremonies and performances and leave profound memories with alumni.  This is not mere nostalgia.  I believe the architecture  creates these feelings nurtured in memory. I have heard alumni call the place “sacred”.   Of course many in the community of Santa Fe, indeed Northern New Mexico, love the Paolo Soleri for it’s intimacy and expressive form as a concert venue.

Last Sunday I attended Stewart Udall’s memorial at the Soleri and felt again the delight emanating from this wonderful place.  Senator Tom Udall brought up the late Secretary’s friendship with Lloyd Kiva New – how it brought the Soleri to life years ago on the IAIA campus. I can’t emphasize enough the importance of this positive architectural power in our time of ever more generic building.  My feeling is that the amphitheater will be an asset to the SFIS program of progressive education.  There’s a saying,  “architecture is the mother of the arts”. When I visit Chaco, or watch The Mystery of Chaco Canyon on TV, I can only believe that the expression transcends cultures.  Many schools would cry to have a building of the Paolo’s inspirational value.  Keeping the amphitheater would provide SFIS students with a vital example of artistic and architectural creativity – and stimulate some creative young souls to become architects.

With your help, we could establish a breathing period, six months or a year, during which the amphitheater’s constituencies could work out a plan and financing for its preservation.  The constituencies include the Indian School, its alumni, the Pueblo Council and Indian Peoples, the community of Santa Fe and New Mexicans and architecture lovers and students.  Lloyd Kiva New and Paolo Soleri gave a gift to the Indian School and to the world.  Please let us, with your guiding wisdom, find a way to steward this treasure for future generations.

Respectfully,

Conrad Skinner
Architect
Santa Fe, NM.

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TOUR GUIDE WITH KABAKOV

Posted in art, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on November 29, 2009 by architectcs

SOLAR LOFT DESIGN

Posted in architecture, cities, design with tags , , , , , on July 6, 2009 by architectcs

LOCATION

 

 

 

THE SOLAR  LOFTS ARE PROPOSED FOR A .16 ACRE LOT ON LOMAS BOULEVARD AT THE SW CORNER OF 12TH STREET.  THE LOCATION ON THE EDGE OF THE 12TH STREET NEIGHBORHOOD EXTENDS  THE RESIDENTIAL PRESENCE OF AN ESTABLISHED  DOWNTOWN COMMUNITY TO A MAJOR ARTERIAL.   THE LOFTS ARE CONVENIENT TO SEVERAL EMPLOYMENT CENTERS;  DOWNTOWN, THE JUDICIAL COMPLEX, OLD TOWN AND THE MUSEUM DISTRICT.  LOMAS BOULEVARD PROVIDES ARTERIAL ACCES TO INTERSTATE 25 AND THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO.

MEWS-TYPE SITE DESIGN

CREATIVE SITE PLANNING MAKES THIS PROJECT WORK:  THE LOFTS RANGE THE LENGTH OF A NEW BUILDING 100′ LONG, 24′ WIDE, AND 26′ HIGH FRONTING THE LOMAS SIDEWALK.  A PRIVATE DRIVEWAY BETWEEN TWELFTH STREET AND THE MID-BLOCK ALLEY SERVES ALL THE UNITS.   A ROW OF  TREES   SCREENS THE NEIGHBORING LOT.  THE 30′ SEPARATION TO THE RESIDENCE TO THE SOUTH MAXIMIZES PRIVACY FOR BOTH PROPERTIES.   THE BUILDING’S  MASS BLOCKS NOISE FROM LOMAS BOULEVARD PROTECTING THE PROPERTY AS AN URBAN OASIS.   SOLAR GLAZING AT THE SOUTH WALL AND BALCONIES AND ROOF DECKS EMPHASIZE THE CONNECTION TO THE OUTDOORS.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LOFT DESIGN
AN ENCLOSED GARDEN BUFFERS THE DRIVEWAY, PROVIDING SECURITY AT THE ENTRANCES.  EACH LOFT RISES FROM A 24′ X 24′ FOOTPRINT   WITH A GARDEN ROOM AND GARAGE ON THE GROUND FLOOR.   A STAIRWAY RISES TO THE LOFT LEVEL WHERE THE OPEN PLAN INCLUDES LIVING, DINING AND KITCHEN AREAS PLUS A BALCONY.

ON THE MEZZANINE ARE THE BEDROOM AND FULL BATH.  A CLERESTORY WINDOW  ADMITS SUNLIGHT TO THE UPPER LOFT.  A LARGE WINDOW OPENS OUT ACROSS THE CITY TO THE SANDIA MOUNTAINS.   A 275 SQUARE FOOT ROOF DECK PROVIDES  PRIVATE  OPEN SPACE.  THE LOFTS EMPHASIZE THE FLOW OF SPACE AND LIGHT.  PASSIVE SOLAR  DESIGN OFFERS UNIQUE ENERGY SAVINGS.  MOST WINTER DAYS THE SUN’S HEAT WILL BE ADEQUATE TO WARM THE INTERIOR.  ON-SITE CISTERNS WILL STORE RAIN WATER FROM THE ROOF FOR LANDSCAPE IRRIGATION.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MARKETS
Surviving homebuilders will refocus on infill concepts – denser communities with mixed uses and town center elements.
Lenders are more favorably disposed to apartments … in strong markets….the long term prognosis will render our 50-year love affair with the suburbs and a car for every driver, unsustainable. We’ll eventually go in and up. “Urban centers will be the driving force in the future.” The prediction is that people will return to the cores where a combination of “entertainment, shopping, culture, and action” can be found.

-EMERGING TRENDS IN REAL ESTATE 2009.  THE URBAN LAND INSTITUTE

LIQUID ARCHITECTURE…OK IT’S VIDEO

Posted in architecture, art with tags , , , on June 24, 2009 by architectcs

The Vasulkas Woody and Steina treat video like material.  Stuff to be manipulated.  Like in their very early animation “The Matter”  which you can see coming out of process,   a wavy strip of nubbly rubber.

This piece SWITCH, (1976), uses a moving vertical video stripe moving against another image field – a room – to superimpose two times and spaces that are very close.  That’s about it for the story but it’s Steina’s walk in slow motion doubled and serious look that doesn’t quite hold and Woody’s studied insouciance that works for me in this room – their lab which is LIQUID ARCHITECTURE where space and time cross each other and the moving images come to a halt through their opposition.  time is my toy.architecture

Adventures in synaesthesia. Le Corbusier and Edgar Varese

Posted in architecture, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on June 16, 2009 by architectcs

Dig this collaboration between the architect and the musician. Of course, Varese produced the sound for Le Corbusier’s Phillips Pavilion at the Brussels 1958 World Exposition. This was one of the first forays into synaesthetic design including architecture, projection and sound where the audience could move through the spaces during performance. Le Corbusier was working on Chandigargh during the pavilion’s construction, leaving oversight to his engineer Xenakis, who shortly after shifted his efforts to music.

HoTLroom

Posted in architecture, art, cities with tags , , , , , on April 7, 2009 by architectcs

Call the vacuum cleaner

Call the vacuum cleaner

So boring, so exciting to fill the vacuum at the Westin Denver.

Jean Prouve Periodical covers

Posted in architecture, design, words with tags , , , , , , on April 1, 2009 by architectcs